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Medications

Abaloparatide injection

What is this medicine?

ABALOPARATIDE (a ball oh PAR a tide) increases bone mass and strength. It helps make healthy bone and to slow bone loss. This medicine is used to prevent bone fracture.

How should I use this medicine?

This medicine is for injection under the skin. You will be taught how to prepare and give this medicine. Use exactly as directed. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed.

It is important that you put your used needles and pens in a special sharps container. Do not put them in a trash can. If you do not have a sharps container, call your pharmacist or health care provider to get one.

A special MedGuide will be given to you by the pharmacist with each prescription and refill. Be sure to read this information carefully each time.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What side effects may I notice from receiving this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue

  • blood in the urine; pain in the lower back or side; pain when urinating

  • signs and symptoms of low blood pressure like dizziness; feeling faint or lightheaded, falls; unusually weak or tired

  • signs and symptoms of increased calcium like nausea; vomiting; constipation; low energy; or muscle weakness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report these to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • headache

  • fast, irregular heartbeat

  • nausea

  • pain, redness, irritation or swelling at the injection site

  • stomach upset or pain

  • tiredness

What may interact with this medicine?

Interactions have not been studied.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses.

Where should I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store unopened pens in the refrigerator between 2 and 8 degrees C (36 and 46 degrees F). Do not freeze. After first use, store your pen for up to 30 days at room temperature between 20 and 25 degrees C (68 and 77 degrees F). Avoid exposure to heat. Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date on the label.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bone disease other than osteoporosis

  • high levels of calcium in the blood

  • high levels of an enzyme called alkaline phosphatase in the blood

  • history of cancer in the bone

  • kidney stone

  • Paget's disease

  • parathyroid disease

  • receiving radiation therapy

  • an unusual or allergic reaction to abaloparatide, other medicines, foods, dyes, or preservatives

  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant

  • breast-feeding

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Visit your doctor or health care professional for regular checks on your progress. You may need blood work done while you are taking this medicine.

You may get dizzy. Do not drive, use machinery, or do anything that needs mental alertness until you know how this medicine affects you. Do not stand or sit up quickly, especially if you are an older patient. This reduces the risk of dizzy or fainting spells. Avoid alcoholic drinks; they can make you more dizzy.

You should make sure that you get enough calcium and vitamin D while you are taking this medicine. Discuss the foods you eat and the vitamins you take with your health care professional.

Talk to your doctor about your risk of cancer. You may be more at risk for certain types of cancers if you take this medicine.


NOTE:This sheet is a summary. It may not cover all possible information. If you have questions about this medicine, talk to your doctor, pharmacist, or health care provider. Copyright© 2017 Elsevier